​What Is Responsive Design, Really? 

What is responsive design?

In short, responsive design can be described as building a site, accounting for the varying screen sizes and resolutions that are commonly found on consumer devices in both mobile and desktop browsing. In function, images and columns of content will adjust to account for the different screen real estate, even hiding or showing different sections of content to mobile or desktop users, who regularly access different types. Think of it as intuitive consistency for a website across devices; it’s a must in modern web design.

Is there anything else I should know?

There are two noteworthy methods for developing a responsive design: fluid and adaptive. A fluid design uses percentages to adjust a responsive site, shrinking each pixel as the browser size changes. Alternatively, adaptive relies on set style sizes that have no break points in between. For instance, the 1400px iteration of a site has one layout, 1024px has another, and in between these sizes nothing changes, until the break point is reached and the site snaps to a new layout size. It’s best to employ and keep up to date on both; different sites may require a different responsive approach.


Source: ​What Is Responsive Design, Really? | Headspace Design


 

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