Weekly Must+Reads

Short: Millennial Tech Survey |  Medium: IoT Wants |  Long: $70,000 Starting Salary


Short | Medium | Long

_above are links to the reading lengths of the various articles/links below_


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| SHORT | [1 minute Read ]

Survey: 90% of Millennials Believe Technology Creates More Opportunity

4 Millenials sitting outside reading their devices: 90% of Millennials Believe Technology Creates More Opportunity

It’s no secret: the new information and technology age is changing the way people live, work, communicate and interact with the world. This is precisely what the Webby Awards and Harris Polls set out to examine in this year’s Webby research report.


Source: Survey: 90% of Millennials Believe Technology Creates More Opportunity | SocialTimes


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| MEDIUM | [4 minute Read]

How People Are Actually Using the Internet of Things

In these early days of the Internet of Things (IoT), much of the focus has been on industrial applications, such as improving operations with autonomous machines, or standalone consumer products, like a Fitbit. But from our research, we’re seeing a more human-centric category of IoT activity starting to emerge. It’s less about automation and more about personal augmentation; less about individual devices and more about “living services” that let people program and connect smart devices however they want.

What People Really Want from the Internet of Things Chart


Source: How People Are Actually Using the Internet of Things | Harvard Buisness Review


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| LONG | 14 minute Read

Here’s What Really Happened at That Company That Set a $70,000 Minimum Wage

Price walked away, shocked and hurt. For three days, he groused about the encounter to family and friends. “I felt horrible,” he says. “Like a victim.” An entrepreneur since he was a teen, Price prided himself on treating employees well at Gravity, which he co-founded in 2004 with his brother Lucas Price. Three years before, as a 16-year-old high school kid, Dan Price saw bar owners being gouged by big financial firms every time they swiped a patron’s credit card. By first outsourcing technology, and then building its own systems, Gravity offered lower prices and better service, and grew rapidly for four years — until the Great Recession nearly wiped it out. Traumatized, Price kept a lid on wages even after the economy recovered — to save the company, of course! Why can’t employees see that? Yet the more people tried to cheer him up about his wage policy, the worse Price felt.

Finally, he realized why: Haley was right — not only about being underpaid, but also about Price’s intentions.


Source: Here’s What Really Happened at That Company That Set a $70,000 Minimum Wage | Inc.com


 

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