The Inconvenience of $1.50

One of the many insidious aspects of late capitalism is its ability to force a competition between time-saving and wage-saving.  The convenience of technology necessitates further trust in and reliance on the rest of society.

[…]

Throughout my life in capitalist cultures, capitalism has taught me, us, to think that saving $1.50 every time we shop is savvy. Bargain hunting has even been elevated to televised sport: Design on a Dime or Extreme Couponing come to mind. If we know anything about a commodity it is how much it costs and speculations on how much we can underpay are seen as responsible financial planning.

[…]

I and everyone else have little information about which soap helps retain collective bargaining power or which brand of toilet paper supports union-busting political action committees. The social life of things prior to their arrival on shelves is purposefully obscured by a veil of individual consumerism.


Source: The Inconvenience of $1.50 | Cyborgology


 

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The Sociology of Unfollowing on Twitter

The average person unfollows 15 to 16 people in that time period. According to the article, people are more likely to be unfollowed when the relationship is:

  1. one-way (such relationships are ‘fragile’ and they are two and a half times more likely to be unfollowed)
  2. new
  3. not informative

Moon’s interviews further showed that people who tweet too often and who consequently dominate a timeline are more likely to be unfollowed, as are people who tweet on uninteresting, mundane or political topics.


Source: The Sociology of Unfollowing on Twitter | The Other Sociologist


 

Tell us something we didn’t already know, Science…

Green with Facebook Envy, Red with Twitter Rage


aa5f2569-4f4d-4059-9ab381bb73b1d080How you act on social media may alleviate or exacerbate negative emotional states Read More

Love and unicorns … can software make us nicer people?

Play nice! How the internet is trying to design out toxic behaviour

Love and unicorns … can software make us nicer people?

Online abuse can be cruel – but for some tech companies it is an existential threat. Can giants such as Facebook use behavioural psychology and persuasive design to tame the trolls? [8 Minute Read]

Read More

Post-emotional Performative Social Media

What is a world in which commercials make you cry?

We lose our ability to detect our own more nuanced emotions, which are almost always small and mundane compared the extraordinary heights of grief, rage, lust, and love that we are exposed to when the news chases down the latest mass tragedy or the movies offer up never-ending tales of epic quests. Meanwhile, in consuming the emotions of others, we get lost. We end up confused by the dissolving of the boundary between personal and vicarious; our bodies can’t tell the difference between friends on TV and those in real life.

When we are triggered to constantly feel all the feelings for all the people everywhere — real ones and fake ones — we don’t have the energy to emotionally respond to the ones that are happening right in front of us. His work was originally inspired by the bland global response to the Bosnian genocide in the ’90s, but applies equally well to the slow, stuttering response — both political and personal — to the refugees fleeing the Syrian Civil War and the constant news of yet another mass shooting in America. The emotional dilution that characterizes a postemotional society makes us less likely to take action when needed. So, when action is needed, we change our Facebook profile picture instead of taking to the streets.

— Lisa Wade


Source: What is a world in which commercials make you cry? | Sociological Images