What a Mobile Website is Supposed to do

mobile-website-oatmeal-comic

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When Algorithms Cheat, who checks them? 

Amazon Says It Puts Customers First. But Its Pricing Algorithm Doesn’t.

Buy Box

Unseen and almost wholly unregulated, algorithms play an increasingly important role in broad swaths of American life. Read More

Why Responsive Design Goes Wrong For Mobile UX

The number of internet users that access pages in the web through mobile devices rises daily. To get to this market, which represents a large percentage of the target market, most marketers have made their websites more mobile friendly. This is common especially where they operate in a tech savvy environment meaning the surfers use mobile devices to access their content. Website developers have used the responsive design to create this mobile friendly sites. The responsive design allows pages to resize based on the size of the screen being used to access it. In some instances this can work to perfection but this is not always the case, sometimes it results in websites failures.


Source: Why Responsive Design Goes Wrong For Mobile UX | AnP Websolutions


 

Don’t Do This: EVER


How To Sell Your Stuff Online

Do you make your own jewelry? Are you a vintage-collector extraordinaire? Maybe you’ve considered starting your own online shop, but have shied away from it, thinking it would be too difficult to do. Well, it actually isn’t as hard or as costly to get started as you may think, but certainly requires hard work and determination for your shop to be successful.

how-to-sell-your-stuff-online nylon article

the smart girl’s guide to starting an online shop of your very own

Source: How To Sell Your Stuff Online | NYLON


Our Analysis Below:


The outline is standard fare:

  1. Build Your Brand & Do Your Research

  2. Actually Build Your Shop

  3. Kill It on Social Media

  4. Keep Pushing!


Read More

Think Before You Appropriate

Think Before You Appropriate PDF

Download “Think Before You Appropriate” A guide for creators & designers

Flexibility

“The web’s greatest strength, I believe, is often seen as a limitation, as a defect. It is the nature of the web to be flexible, and it should be our role as designers and developers to embrace this flexibility and product pages which, by being flexible, are accessible to all.”

—John Allsop


Source: Chapter 10 | Foundations of Web Design


 

The evolution of autoplay 

How do you come up with metrics that properly track meaningful attention, not just playcounts? (Probably no impression is completely meaningless, but some are definitely more meaningful than others.) What do you do about audio? The best implementations I’ve seen start autoplay in silent mode with captions. Unexpected autoplay audio is a deep annoyance — motion and text, not so much. And there’s a lot of experimentation to be done with text-heavy video, particularly on the news side. I believe silent with captions will become an emerging standard, both on big platforms and on publishers’ sites.

evolution of autoplay by tim carmody

Click picture to read the entire article


Source: The evolution of autoplay | Nieman Journalism Lab


 

How Did Apple lose its way?

How Apple Is Giving Design A Bad Name


Now, although the products are indeed even more beautiful than before, that beauty has come at a great price. Gone are the fundamental principles of good design: discoverability, feedback, recovery, and so on. Instead, Apple has, in striving for beauty, created fonts that are so small or thin, coupled with low contrast, that they are difficult or impossible for many people with normal vision to read. We have obscure gestures that are beyond even the developer’s ability to remember. We have great features that most people don’t realize exist.


Source: How Apple Is Giving Design A Bad Name | FastCoDesign


+Commentary: This is a great longform article that deconstructs the very notion of what good design is supposed to be & represent. It also focuses on the shift to touch and portables that demand a completely different framework. Many of the things pointed out in the article are things experienced first hand, while teaching the horde of new converts to Apple products (especially those at the older end of the spectrum) how to use them.   Read More

Morris 

 

As a foundation for the future, we developed a unique brand identity that could evolve with each new offering. Custom letterforms, inspired by Russian constructivism, maintain their shape across the range, but the nature of the mark is free to adapt to match each new venture. A cohesive secondary language, “eatmor,” helps to tie the offerings together.

Contributed by Sarah Codraro of New York-based Pearlfisher.


Source: Morris | Identity Designed


 

Negotiations: Currency of Attention

Now, it’s reasonable for me to expect that the site requires a revenue stream. It’s reasonable to expect that there’ll be some way to monetise my presence there. But that’s it; that’s where the line is. In every other context in life, I get to choose whether to participate in the resulting transaction. With advertising, though, you’ve made the decision for me – in fact, several decisions: the means, format, and currency of exchange.

It’s the last one that’s particularly troubling. Without even giving me the chance to opt out, you’ve declared – as soon as I stepped in the door, and before I’ve looked around – that I owe you the currency of attention. Read More

Brand Identity Process

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Think about it:

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Design vs User Experience meme

Design vs User Experience

Design vs User Experience meme

Sharing ≠ Reading

 What You Think You Know About the Web Is Wrong 

If you’re an average reader, I’ve got your attention for 15 seconds, so here goes: We are getting a lot wrong about the web these days. We confuse what people have clicked on for what they’ve read. We mistake sharing for reading. We race towards new trends like native advertising without fixing what was wrong with the old ones and make the same mistakes all over again. Read More

5 SEO Factors to Focus on in 2015 (Plus 2 Not to Worry About)

If you look back at the digital marketing industry prior to 2012 and compare it to what it is today, it’s fair to say that much has changed. Most of the change that has occurred in the SEO industry over the past few years has been positive and has encouraged businesses to provide a better overall user experience through design, content, and community.

The way people search for products and the devices and mediums they use to find them are constantly evolving, which represent a continuous opportunity to find and reach new audiences. With this in mind, here is a look at five key areas of focus for 2015, plus two areas you shouldn’t worry about too much.

Important Factors

  1. Optimize Your Site For Mobile Search
  2. Improve Search Quality Metrics
  3. Work to Become A Destination
  4. Improve Your Social Media Presence
  5. Use Schema Markup

Two Less Important SEO Factors for 2015

  1. Number of Inbound LInks
  2. EMAT – Exact Match Anchor Text

Read More at Big Marketing

Gamification

The theory of games is that players will pursue the finish line if the journey is rewarding and pleasant. Gamification encapsulates that experience and uses it to drive results. Make the journey a stimulating one, and your users are more likely to seek out the end of that road (wherever you want them to be). Right now, users are online for a number of reasons: social, education, shopping, entertainment, the list goes on! Though these purposes vary, the one thing they have in common is that users must interact with a UI (user interface) to achieve gratification. As a business or website owner, you want as many users using your website for as long as possible. That goal comes with two expectations: that your UI is simple/intuitive, and that it’s satisfying.

Gamification is a good way to tackle the ‘satisfying’ aspect of your UI. If an experience is fun and rewarding, users will stay engaged and complete navigational tasks by nature. These rewards can take the form of slick animations, illustrations, custom messages, progression achievements and so much more. Higher forms of gamification even take on progress bars, badges (community forums are a good example), and leaderboards – all of which encourage return traffic and time investments before you even begin writing content! That incentive to explore and interact can (and will, if executed well) make the process of navigating any website feel natural, and therefore invisible, which affords your site some complexities that might have been impractical otherwise.


Source: Gamification | Headspace Design


 

​What Is Responsive Design, Really? 

What is responsive design?

In short, responsive design can be described as building a site, accounting for the varying screen sizes and resolutions that are commonly found on consumer devices in both mobile and desktop browsing. In function, images and columns of content will adjust to account for the different screen real estate, even hiding or showing different sections of content to mobile or desktop users, who regularly access different types. Think of it as intuitive consistency for a website across devices; it’s a must in modern web design.

Is there anything else I should know?

There are two noteworthy methods for developing a responsive design: fluid and adaptive. A fluid design uses percentages to adjust a responsive site, shrinking each pixel as the browser size changes. Alternatively, adaptive relies on set style sizes that have no break points in between. For instance, the 1400px iteration of a site has one layout, 1024px has another, and in between these sizes nothing changes, until the break point is reached and the site snaps to a new layout size. It’s best to employ and keep up to date on both; different sites may require a different responsive approach.


Source: ​What Is Responsive Design, Really? | Headspace Design


 

Your Site Sucks: 4 Reasons Why Everything Is Going Wrong


Source: Your Website Sucks: 4 Reasons Why Everything Is Going Wrong with Your Website #infographic


 

Can’t Beat ’em, Join Them

After adopting infinite scroll Time.com’s bounce rate down 15% 

Three major news website redesigns this year look very different but have an important feature in common: articles that seamlessly transition to new content, without requiring readers to click or tap headlines and then wait for new pages to load.

This “continuous scroll” strategy for news sites’ article pages is gaining momentum. It’s been adopted by Time.comNBCNews.com and LATimes.com, reflecting the fact that direct homepage traffic is waning (see the New York Times innovation report), and traffic from social media (particularly Facebook) just keeps growing.

So as readers increasingly enter sites from “side doors” or article pages, media organizations are trying to figure out how to get them to stick around. Pew recently found that visitors from Facebook are far less engaged than direct visitors. Here’s how sites that relaunched in the first half of 2014 are addressing that problem by making use of the continuous scroll (aka infinite scroll) feature in their article pages:

Read More at Poynter

Design Process

Infographic of Design Process

UX Design: a real thing or just a pretentious buzzword?

UX Strategy is all about the very high-level aspects of a project. It asks questions like:

  1. What are the business goals of this product?
  2. Is it a sound business model?
  3. Is it technically and practically feasible, and is there a market need?
  4. Who are the end users?
  5. What do they want and how will this product make their life easier?

Source: UX Design – a real thing or just a pretentious buzzword? | Headspace Design


Rule #1:

Jakob’s Law of the Web User Experience states that “users spend most of their time on other websites.” This means that they form their expectations for your site based on what’s commonly done on most other sites. If you deviate, your site will be harder to use and users will leave.


Source: Top 10 Mistakes in Web Design


 

What Is User Experience Design?

Websites and Web applications have become progressively more complex as our industry’s technologies and methodologies advance. What used to be a one-way static medium has evolved into a very rich and interactive experience.But regardless of how much has changed in the production process, a website’s success still hinges on just one thing: how users perceive it. “Does this website give me value? Is it easy to use? Is it pleasant to use?” These are the questions that run through the minds of visitors as they interact with our products, and they form the basis of their decisions on whether to become regular users.User experience design is all about striving to make them answer “Yes” to all of those questions.


Source: What Is User Experience Design?Smashing Magazine


This is what happens when Facebook changes its layout


Source: This is what happens when Facebook changes its layout The Oatmeal


 

Facebook Ch-Ch-Changes

Well as Dorothy Parker might say:

“What Fresh Hell is This”

#NewAndNotImprovedNewsfeed