Publishing Violence in the Age of Social Media

Instagram Posts May Have Escalated Fatal Standoff, Police Say

The episode highlights Facebook’s increasingly complicated role in documenting violence, and in some cases, its active place in the middle of it. Before the shots were fired, the Instagram posts caught the police’s attention. Read More

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Publish: Just Hit Enter

APRIL: Focus

So you want to be published? Nothing is stopping you these days. In fact it has never been easier to write/publish/edit your way into a prominent position in no time. However, before you do any of those things it is best to make sure you are ready to receive all that attention.

Everything you need to know about publishing cover crop

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The important, recent and popular

Facebook is eating the world

Here is a definite must-read for everyone. Pondering the long-term viability of publishing when they are no longer in control of the distribution channels. How you get to read or who gets to decide what you see?


Illustration: AP | 9m read |original

Our news ecosystem has changed more dramatically in the past five years than perhaps at any time in the past five hundred. We are seeing huge leaps in technical capability—virtual reality, live video, artificially intelligent news bots, instant messaging, and chat apps. We are seeing massive changes in control, and finance, putting the future of our publishing ecosystem into the hands of a few, who now control the destiny of many.

Social media hasn’t just swallowed journalism, it has swallowed everything. It has swallowed political campaigns, banking systems, personal histories, the leisure industry, retail, even government and security. The phone in our pocket is our portal to the world.

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Adblocking and Facebook’s prominence threaten to thwart access by readers

As publishers lose control, are newspaper websites a dead parrot?

Adblocking and the power of platforms such as Facebook threaten to block the pipes that lead to readers


A truth is dawning on media owners (or in many cases it has dawned, but they don’t like to talk about it). Publishing is over. Obviously this isn’t true in its purest sense; publishing is actually flourishing, just not for publishers.


Source: As publishers lose control, are newspaper websites a dead parrot? | The Guardian


Book Publishing Diversity?

Most Book Publishing Professionals are Straight White Women

Diversity in Publishing Infographic

The Diversity Baseline Survey includes feedback from 34 publishers and 8 review journals.

 

Source: Most Book Publishing Professionals Are Straight White Women | GalleyCat

The evolution of autoplay 

How do you come up with metrics that properly track meaningful attention, not just playcounts? (Probably no impression is completely meaningless, but some are definitely more meaningful than others.) What do you do about audio? The best implementations I’ve seen start autoplay in silent mode with captions. Unexpected autoplay audio is a deep annoyance — motion and text, not so much. And there’s a lot of experimentation to be done with text-heavy video, particularly on the news side. I believe silent with captions will become an emerging standard, both on big platforms and on publishers’ sites.

evolution of autoplay by tim carmody

Click picture to read the entire article


Source: The evolution of autoplay | Nieman Journalism Lab


 

Death of Snackable Content

The Death of Snackable Content

Every other headline out there today promises to break topics down into bite-sized bits. “4 Ways to Be a Better Leader,” “8 Steps to a Healthier Lifestyle,” “16 Abuses From the CIA Torture Report” — it seems as if no topic is too serious or nuanced to undergo “snackification.”

Like Cheetos and M&Ms, these articles lend themselves to mindless consumption. There is nothing wrong with them in moderation, but at some point, you start to crave something with more substance. Today’s readers want more than listicles and clickbait, and this is driving meaningful change across the digital publishing industry. Read More

Can’t Beat ’em, Join Them

After adopting infinite scroll Time.com’s bounce rate down 15% 

Three major news website redesigns this year look very different but have an important feature in common: articles that seamlessly transition to new content, without requiring readers to click or tap headlines and then wait for new pages to load.

This “continuous scroll” strategy for news sites’ article pages is gaining momentum. It’s been adopted by Time.comNBCNews.com and LATimes.com, reflecting the fact that direct homepage traffic is waning (see the New York Times innovation report), and traffic from social media (particularly Facebook) just keeps growing.

So as readers increasingly enter sites from “side doors” or article pages, media organizations are trying to figure out how to get them to stick around. Pew recently found that visitors from Facebook are far less engaged than direct visitors. Here’s how sites that relaunched in the first half of 2014 are addressing that problem by making use of the continuous scroll (aka infinite scroll) feature in their article pages:

Read More at Poynter