The Inconvenience of $1.50

One of the many insidious aspects of late capitalism is its ability to force a competition between time-saving and wage-saving.  The convenience of technology necessitates further trust in and reliance on the rest of society.

[…]

Throughout my life in capitalist cultures, capitalism has taught me, us, to think that saving $1.50 every time we shop is savvy. Bargain hunting has even been elevated to televised sport: Design on a Dime or Extreme Couponing come to mind. If we know anything about a commodity it is how much it costs and speculations on how much we can underpay are seen as responsible financial planning.

[…]

I and everyone else have little information about which soap helps retain collective bargaining power or which brand of toilet paper supports union-busting political action committees. The social life of things prior to their arrival on shelves is purposefully obscured by a veil of individual consumerism.


Source: The Inconvenience of $1.50 | Cyborgology


 

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The Sociology of Unfollowing on Twitter

The average person unfollows 15 to 16 people in that time period. According to the article, people are more likely to be unfollowed when the relationship is:

  1. one-way (such relationships are ‘fragile’ and they are two and a half times more likely to be unfollowed)
  2. new
  3. not informative

Moon’s interviews further showed that people who tweet too often and who consequently dominate a timeline are more likely to be unfollowed, as are people who tweet on uninteresting, mundane or political topics.


Source: The Sociology of Unfollowing on Twitter | The Other Sociologist


 

Brands React to: #LoveWins 

Should Your Brand go Gay-For-Pay During Pride Season?

Wondering if your brand should show support for Marriage Equality or Pride Celebrations? 2015 seemed to confirm that you should.

So, in case you weren’t on Social Media (*gasp*) since Friday morning, in which case this post might be irrelevant to you, then you might not have noticed the profusion of rainbows coloring every icon, profile picture, and post. They were kind of hard to LoveWins 10m Tweetsmiss, as statistics rolling in on Monday morning proved. You can be forgiven, or even granted immunity, if you didn’t greet this with an enthusiastic embrace, don’t worry not all of us did either. Read More

Never-Ending Myths About Online Abuse

After building online communities for two decades, we’ve learned how to fight abuse. It’s a solvable problem. We just have to stop repeating the same myths as excuses not to fix things.


Source: The Immortal Myths About Online Abuse —@anildash Medium


+Commentary: This is a great read…and necessary, since constant reinforcement of this idea demands disabusing the trope that we should just “ignore it” for it to go away is utterly insane. It hasn’t worked, and frequently leads to business lost, a damaged brand, a reduction in ability to provide for yourself or family. It can at times even be physically violent & threatening. This not only affects the people who are targeted but will extend to those they love, the businesses they work at, and other tertiary lives.

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When all else fails create a mnemonic acronym

D.E.A.L. and L.E.A.N.

Back in October, Mr. Cunningham penned an open letter on behalf of the IAB (Interactive Advertising Bureau) telling content providers and others, “We messed up.”

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#oscarssowhite Illustration by DAKrolak GLEAMsocial

Oscars vs #OscarsSoWhite

or: Majority Illusion Paradox and Backlash vs The Oscars

(for most that title will be too wonky. Below is the article that inspired it followed by commentary about how you too can benefit from scrutinizing your “network” of assocations and might even win your own David vs Goliath story)

Your Network’s Structure Matters More than Its Size

Researchers at the University of Southern California recently uncovered the majority illusion, a paradox within social networks that makes some ideas, behaviors, or attributes appear widespread even when they are not. Since we can’t keep an eye on what the entire world is up to, we’re limited to witnessing what our social network says and does. At times, well-connected members within our network can skew our perception of how common an idea or behavior actually is.


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Tell us something we didn’t already know, Science…

Green with Facebook Envy, Red with Twitter Rage


aa5f2569-4f4d-4059-9ab381bb73b1d080How you act on social media may alleviate or exacerbate negative emotional states Read More

Love and unicorns … can software make us nicer people?

Play nice! How the internet is trying to design out toxic behaviour

Love and unicorns … can software make us nicer people?

Online abuse can be cruel – but for some tech companies it is an existential threat. Can giants such as Facebook use behavioural psychology and persuasive design to tame the trolls? [8 Minute Read]

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Online Enlightenment Header Screencap by GLEAMsocial

What is an Enlightened Web Experience and how do we get it? [Infographic]

The question almost never comes up anymore: why optimize performance? It’s rarely asked because there’s an abundance of data proving that optimization has an impact on crucial metrics like conversion rate and engagement.  […read the rest at the link below]

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heartbeat of heartache_inforgraphic header

Customer Relationship Goals

Summary: A good friendship or romantic partnership takes work. The same goes for customer relationships. Today’s consumers are looking for brands with experiences that feel personalized and effortless and will last long beyond the transaction. Great customer service keeps your customer relationships strong. And it can keep the love (of your brand) alive.

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Too little, too late

Red Lobster Fail: Cheddar Bey Biscuits

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Who Rules The Social Web? [2009]

Information is Beautiful Gender Demographics of Social Networks 2009

Source: Who Rules The Social Web? | Information is Beautiful

Nostaligia give you the sadz?

Facebook lets you filter bad memories out of your nostalgia


Facebook is a nostalgia machine, with features like “Year in Review” and “On This Day” summoning photos and posts from the past in an attempt to entertain users. However, these memories aren’t always welcome, and the social network has often been accused of “inadvertent algorithmic cruelty” — accidentally confronting users with painful memories, like images of dead friends and relatives, without warning. To avoid this the company is introducing a pair of filters for its “On This Day” tool, letting users specify individuals and dates they don’t want to be reminded of.


Source: Facebook lets you filter bad memories out of your nostalgia | The Verge


+Commentary: So when they created “On This Day” they clearly did know that people often have meltdowns, crisis, and very sad things they share openly with their friends. Many years ago, as it was becoming popular there were several live-suicides, prior to them introducing a self-harm reporting process. Surely someone on their UX & UI teams, a few of the engineers, maybe the team that handles the reportage process brought this to their attention?

Don’t get me wrong, enjoying that trip down memory lane is great for me personally, and since I’ve only lost a few friends recently, it is actually refreshing to see the comedic routines we engaged in for the past few years. Even if they are at times tinged with a touch of sadness. They compensate for the fact that he’s no longer here & not posting, so it is like his “Greatest Hits” of Social Media. Read More

Post-Emotional Performative Web? 

What is a world in which commercials make you cry?

In his book named after the idea, sociologist Stjepan Meštrović describes contemporary Western societies as postemotional. By invoking the prefix “post,” he doesn’t mean to suggest that we no longer have any emotions at all, but that we have become numb to our emotions, so much so that we may not feel them the way we once did.

This, he argues, is a result of being exposed to a “daily diet of phoniness”: a barrage of emotional manipulation from every corner of culture, news, entertainment, infotainment, and advertising. In this postemotional society, our emotions have become a natural resource that, like spring water, is tapped at no cost to serve corporations with goals of maximizing mass consumption and fattening their own wallets. Even companies that make stuff like gum. Read More

Post-emotional Performative Social Media

What is a world in which commercials make you cry?

We lose our ability to detect our own more nuanced emotions, which are almost always small and mundane compared the extraordinary heights of grief, rage, lust, and love that we are exposed to when the news chases down the latest mass tragedy or the movies offer up never-ending tales of epic quests. Meanwhile, in consuming the emotions of others, we get lost. We end up confused by the dissolving of the boundary between personal and vicarious; our bodies can’t tell the difference between friends on TV and those in real life.

When we are triggered to constantly feel all the feelings for all the people everywhere — real ones and fake ones — we don’t have the energy to emotionally respond to the ones that are happening right in front of us. His work was originally inspired by the bland global response to the Bosnian genocide in the ’90s, but applies equally well to the slow, stuttering response — both political and personal — to the refugees fleeing the Syrian Civil War and the constant news of yet another mass shooting in America. The emotional dilution that characterizes a postemotional society makes us less likely to take action when needed. So, when action is needed, we change our Facebook profile picture instead of taking to the streets.

— Lisa Wade


Source: What is a world in which commercials make you cry? | Sociological Images


 

Death of Snackable Content

The Death of Snackable Content

Every other headline out there today promises to break topics down into bite-sized bits. “4 Ways to Be a Better Leader,” “8 Steps to a Healthier Lifestyle,” “16 Abuses From the CIA Torture Report” — it seems as if no topic is too serious or nuanced to undergo “snackification.”

Like Cheetos and M&Ms, these articles lend themselves to mindless consumption. There is nothing wrong with them in moderation, but at some point, you start to crave something with more substance. Today’s readers want more than listicles and clickbait, and this is driving meaningful change across the digital publishing industry. Read More

New Facebook Research Shows People Care About Their Phones – A Lot

In one of the more unusual, yet interesting, research projects from Facebook, analysts from The Social Network have investigated how people deal with losing their mobile phones, through the filter of the Facebook experience. They’ve released their findings on the Facebook IQ blog, highlighting the number and frequency of conversations that happen on the platform regarding lost phones.

Lack of Friends is Killing Us?

In 1985 most people said they had 3 close friends. In 2004 the most common number was zero.

Via Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect:

In a survey given in 1985, people were asked to list their friends in response to the question “Over the last six months, who are the people with whom you discussed matters important to you?” The most common number of friends listed was three; 59 percent of respondents listed three or more friends fitting this description.  Read More

Abundance vs Scarcity

Abundance Consciousness Vs Scarcity Mindset

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A Primer on the Service Economy

The phrase “service economy” — commonly used to describe the U.S. economic profile these days — refers to a decrease in manufacturing (where we make things for people) and an increase in the service sector (where we do stuff for people). Read More