ProTips: #Twitter Search

10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know You Could Do With #Twitter Search

+Note: Was skeptical at first but found a few we didn’t know. Click the picture above or the link below to see the full list by Social Times.


Source: 10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know You Could Do With #Twitter Search | SocialTimes


 

Higher engagement with micro-influencers?

As Instagram follower numbers rise, engagement decreases, according to the findings of a new study.


Source: Brand marketers see higher engagement with micro-influencers: Survey | Marketing Dive


 

The dark side of Guardian comments

How should digital news organisations respond to this? Some say it is simple – “Don’t read the comments” or, better still, switch them off altogether. And many have done just that, disabling their comment threads for good because they became too taxing to bother with.

But in so many cases journalism is enriched by responses from its readers. So why disable all comments when only a small minority is a problem?

At the Guardian, we felt it was high time to examine the problem rather than turn away.

+NOTE: some really great interactive visualizations go along with the data accompanying this article at the link below:


Source: The dark side of Guardian commentsThe Guardian


 

Insta-Series, say wha?!?!

Instagram Snags Exclusive David Bowie Mini-Series

The late David Bowie will be featured in an upcoming mini-series on a rather surprising platform.

The famed artist’s company announced on Monday that Instagram will be the exclusive home to “Unbound: A Blackstar InstaMiniSeries.” The 16-episode mini-series will premiere on Instagram on Thursday, Feb. 25 at 8 p.m. EST. Bowie’s representatives say that the subsequent episodes will land on Instagram each subsequent Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday.


Source: Instagram Snags Exclusive David Bowie Mini-Series | Fortune


 

Love and unicorns … can software make us nicer people?

Play nice! How the internet is trying to design out toxic behaviour

Love and unicorns … can software make us nicer people?

Online abuse can be cruel – but for some tech companies it is an existential threat. Can giants such as Facebook use behavioural psychology and persuasive design to tame the trolls? [8 Minute Read]

Read More

Adblocking and Facebook’s prominence threaten to thwart access by readers

As publishers lose control, are newspaper websites a dead parrot?

Adblocking and the power of platforms such as Facebook threaten to block the pipes that lead to readers


A truth is dawning on media owners (or in many cases it has dawned, but they don’t like to talk about it). Publishing is over. Obviously this isn’t true in its purest sense; publishing is actually flourishing, just not for publishers.


Source: As publishers lose control, are newspaper websites a dead parrot? | The Guardian


How Facebook Squashed Twitter

…but for nearly everyone else in the world it is Facebook that is the first thing people check, not just in the morning but in all of the empty spaces of their lives. In short, it’s not simply that Twitter needs to convince users to give the service a second-chance, something that is already far more difficult than getting users to sign up for the first time; it’s that even if the service magically had the perfect on-boarding experience leading to the perfect algorithmically-driven feed, it’s not clear why the users it needs would bother looking up from their Facebook feeds.

Facebook vs Twitter graph MMAUs


Source: How Facebook Squashed Twitter | Stratechery


Read the entire thing article at the link above

How to do a Product Critique

How to do a Product Critique

Listen, product design isn’t some innate skill one is born with, like having a good ear for distinguishing notes or possessing exceptionally powerful twitch muscles for sprinting across an Olympic stage. Developing good product intuition—by which I mean developing a good sixth sense about what features or experiences will resonate with people and become successful—is about two core tenets: 1) understanding people’s desires, and 2) understanding how people react to things.


Source: How to do a Product Critique — The Year of the Looking Glass | Medium


 

After Twitter’s Executive Exodus, What Happens Next?

…since executive turmoil has become one of Twitter’s most defining characteristics over the years. It has had a strikingly high level of turnover at its highest ranks, and Sunday’s mass exodus simply reinforces that image.

As one source put it to me: This is just Twitter being Twitter.

So what comes next?


Source: After Twitter’s Executive Exodus, What Happens Next? | Re/code


 

Most of your Facebook friends couldn’t care less about you

Filed Under: Stating the Obvious in Scientific Studies

Even if you have thousands of Facebook friends, you can probably only count on a handful in a pinch, according to a new study. The author, anthropologist Robin Dunbar, should know. He’s the guy who came up with Dunbar’s number, which shows that in the real world, people can only maintain about 150 stable relationships. For his latest research, Dunbar analyzed a UK study of 3,375 Facebook users between the ages of 18 and 65. On average, folks had 150 followers but said that they could only count on 4.1 of them during an “emotional crisis,” and only 13.6 ever express sympathy.


Source: Most of your Facebook friends couldn’t care less about you | engadget


 

Pay Me What You Owe Me!

For freelancers, getting stiffed is part of the job. Some in NYC want to fix it.

New York City, however, might soon see a fix for that problem. A bill being introduced in the City Council Monday would require all employers to put contracts in writing, impose civil and criminal penalties for taking longer than 30 days to deliver payments, and award double damages plus attorneys fees to contractors who’ve been stiffed — similar to the protections now enjoyed by regular employees.


Source: For freelancers, getting stiffed is part of the job. Some in New York City want to fix it. | The Washington Post


 

On blogs and blogging

Thoughts on what blogs are, and how our words for them are trivialising.

Instead of posting, you’re publishing. If you were a blogger, maybe you’re a journalist.

Instead of blogging, you’re writing.

Try those words on for size. See how they feel.

Whatever your blog is, and the term is so fluid as to be unhelpful at best and trivialising at worst, it’s something.


Source: On blogsMatt Gemmell


 

Things You Probably Didn’t Realize

Google’s ad penalties are more significant than Apple’s Ad-Blocker

“Highly unlikely” would probably be how you’d have responded a year ago to someone telling you two of the largest tech companies in the world — Apple and Google — would both try to fix mobile advertising by blocking ads, but that’s currently the case.

For instance, much has been made of a new feature allowing iPhone and iPad owners to block advertisements in Safari when iOS 9 debuts –with the rationale that it will enhance web browsing. But Google’s recent decision to start penalizing websites featuring app install ads –intrusive ad units that slow page load times and engulf the entire screen — might be a more significant way to improve the browsing experience.


Source: Google’s ad penalties are more significant than Apple’s ad blocker | Gigaom


+Note: Good read if you do any sort of display advertising!

 Twitter Moments?!?! You Too Twitter?

Riddle me this. Why won’t people just ignore Twitter’s new Moments tab? How will Moments make money? Will Twitter pay publishers that create them? Today Twitter launched Moments, its way to easily follow current events that could help it seduce new users and revive those who never got hooked.

In many ways it addresses Twitter’s biggest problems — that the service is difficult to pick up and only works best if you check it constantly. But there’s a lot of uncertainty about what it will mean for Twitter’s users, business and partners.


Source: 9 Big Unanswered Questions About Twitter Moments | TechCrunch


 

Use Ad blockers and you are the new hot ad-targeting segment

The idea of pushing ads at people who have made a deliberate choice not to see them might seem bizarre. But as a demo that’s young, male-skewing and tech-focused, they’re an attractive audience for certain advertisers. Ironically, in their extreme measures to reject the interest of advertisers, ad blockers are just making advertisers more interested. Think of it as the negging of The Ad Game.

“We have long anticipated that ad blocking would eventually reach a level where some brands would be unable to reach their audience,” said Sean Blanchfield, CEO of PageFair, which sells tech that circumvents ad blockers. “This is now happening, and agencies that represent video games brands (e.g., Xbox, Playstation, EA, Activision and Ubisoft) are beginning to actively seek a way to market to ad block users.”


Source: Ad tech always wins: Ad blocker users are the new hot ad-targeting segment | Digiday


 

Apple might finally let you delete preinstalled iPhone apps?!?!

According to Tim Cook, Apple is “looking at” letting consumers get rid of default iPhone apps that are rarely used. These are the ones you almost always hide away in a folder the minute you set up your new iPhone: Compass, Stocks, Podcasts, Tips, etc…


Source: Apple might finally let you delete apps that come with the iPhone | The Verge


 

+ NOTE: Yes, Please. Let others ((cough, cough ANDROID+providers)) do the same. From Tim Cook’s lips to the Tech God’s ear.

 

Great Reputations for Fake Businesses

I created a fake business and bought it an amazing online reputation

I created a fake business and bought it an amazing online reputation

If you live in the Bay Area and have looked for something special to spice up a birthday party, you might have discovered the Freakin’ Awesome Karaoke Express, a truck that promises to deliver an unbelievable selection of songs to your doorstep. You might have seen a review on Yelp that said it’s perfect for a girl’s night out or a Facebook review that mentioned it being a crowd-pleaser at a neighborhood block party. You may have been impressed by its 19,000 Twitter followers, and considered hiring this mobile song-slinging truck to drive up to your next outdoor shindig. Read More

How audience engagement editors guide online discussions

Through it all, a new kind of journalist was on the story.

Along with traditional reporters and editors, The Wall Street Journal’s nearly two-year-old audience engagement team fueled the outlet’s coverage of the slayings. The team simultaneously verified information, promoted Journal articles and social media posts on the killings, managed reader comments, and shuffled online feedback and analytics to their colleagues. “The audience team is just like your shoe-leather reporters,” says Carla Zanoni, head of emerging media and audience development, “in that they feel like this is what they’ve been training for.” Read More

How To Banish Bad Bots From Your Site Analytics

You can do that by using them to identify bad bots, which, more and more, are executing JavaScript, inflating analytics numbers, expending your resources and scraping and duplicating content.The Incapsula 2014 bot traffic report looked at 20,000 websites (of all sizes) over a 90-day period and found that bots account for 56% of all website traffic; 29% were malicious in nature.
Read More

New Facebook Research Shows People Care About Their Phones – A Lot

In one of the more unusual, yet interesting, research projects from Facebook, analysts from The Social Network have investigated how people deal with losing their mobile phones, through the filter of the Facebook experience. They’ve released their findings on the Facebook IQ blog, highlighting the number and frequency of conversations that happen on the platform regarding lost phones.

When metrics drive newsroom culture

“Metrics inspire a range of strong feelings in journalists, such as excitement, anxiety, self-doubt, triumph, competition, and demoralization,” Petre writes. Depending on how they’re implemented, metrics can have vastly divergent effects on editorial culture. But regardless of how newsrooms shield their staff, Petre found, the emotional effect remains.

Read More

20 Free Tools for Entrepreneurs

20 Free Tools for Entrepreneurs

by Johnny Webber


 

1. slimvoice.co – Create insanely simple invoices.

2. wetransfer.com – Transfer up to 2 GB of data.

3. similarweb.com – Get insights for any website or app.

4. coffitivity.com – Ambient sounds to boost creativity.

5. nibbler.silktide.com – A tool for testing website accessibility, SEO, and social media.

6. crowdriff.com/riffle – Get Twitter engagement, interest and activity analytics in real time

7. woorank.com – Another analytical website tool.

8. redditlater.com – Find out the best times to post on reddit.com.

9. builtwith.com – Find out what websites are built with.

10. mailchimp.com – Create an email newsletter for your users.

11. surveymonkey.com – Create surveys, get answers.

12. joinme.com – Instant screen sharing for meetings.

13. hootsuite.com – Streamline your social presence.

14. strikingly.com – Make a beautiful website for free.

15. unroll.me – Clean up your inbox. Save time on email.

16. picmonkey.com – Photo editing made easy.

17. growthhackers.com – A marketing discussion community.

18. thenameapp.com – Find a name for your idea.

19. hemingwayapp.com – Make your writing bold and clear.

20. compressor.io – Optimize and compress your images online.


via 20 Free Tools for Entrepreneurs | Johnny Lists.


 

Content Shock

What to Know Before Creating a Content Marketing Strategy

This post is based on our white paper “Outside-The-Box Content Marketing for PR.”

A week into 2014, Mark Schaefer published a blog post that questioned whether content marketing – which he termed “the hottest marketing trend around” – was a sustainable strategy for businesses.

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He coined “content shock” and argued that though more and more businesses give away more and more content, people have only finite time to consume it. Read More

5 SEO Factors to Focus on in 2015 (Plus 2 Not to Worry About)

If you look back at the digital marketing industry prior to 2012 and compare it to what it is today, it’s fair to say that much has changed. Most of the change that has occurred in the SEO industry over the past few years has been positive and has encouraged businesses to provide a better overall user experience through design, content, and community.

The way people search for products and the devices and mediums they use to find them are constantly evolving, which represent a continuous opportunity to find and reach new audiences. With this in mind, here is a look at five key areas of focus for 2015, plus two areas you shouldn’t worry about too much.

Important Factors

  1. Optimize Your Site For Mobile Search
  2. Improve Search Quality Metrics
  3. Work to Become A Destination
  4. Improve Your Social Media Presence
  5. Use Schema Markup

Two Less Important SEO Factors for 2015

  1. Number of Inbound LInks
  2. EMAT – Exact Match Anchor Text

Read More at Big Marketing

Postmortem of a Venture-backed Startup

Lessons Learned from the rise and fall of @Sonar

For those unfamiliar, Sonar Media Inc. was a mobile app created to help make the world a friendlier place. Our mobile app buzzed in your pocket when friends were near and ushered in a new wave of “Ambient Social Networking” companies. Downloaded by millions of people all over the world, Sonar was promoted by Apple and Google in 100+ countries, won numerous awards such as runner-up at TechCrunch Disrupt and Ad:Tech Best Mobile Startup, raised nearly $2,000,000 from prominent angels and VCs, and was featured on more than 300 publications including the New York Times, CNN, CNBC, TechCrunch, and TIME.

And yet, we failed.

We did lots of things right and lots of things wrong at Sonar. I do my best to share a few of our lessons learned. Read More at Medium

Master Storytelling Technique to Create Irresistible Content Series

In this cold, hard, commercial world, everyone is looking for answers online.

We are all “searchers” looking for the best way to solve a problem or satisfy a desire.

And we are ruthless …

We make split-second decisions about clicking a headline.

How does your website look at a glance?

If you try to consummate the fragile exchange of attention and education too quickly with a “buy this” button, you’ll likely lose long-term prospects and lifetime sales.

The reality is — whether you sell garden hoses or reputation management services — you have to master the know-like-trust factor first.

How do you accomplish this vital component of content marketing?

You educate people step-by-step.

And, if you ignite a feeling that inspires a commercial transaction, then you’ve created successful content marketing.

You lift prospects out of their ordinary worlds and invite them to consider a journey that ultimately leads to a transaction.

Read More at Copyblogger

Can’t Beat ’em, Join Them

After adopting infinite scroll Time.com’s bounce rate down 15% 

Three major news website redesigns this year look very different but have an important feature in common: articles that seamlessly transition to new content, without requiring readers to click or tap headlines and then wait for new pages to load.

This “continuous scroll” strategy for news sites’ article pages is gaining momentum. It’s been adopted by Time.comNBCNews.com and LATimes.com, reflecting the fact that direct homepage traffic is waning (see the New York Times innovation report), and traffic from social media (particularly Facebook) just keeps growing.

So as readers increasingly enter sites from “side doors” or article pages, media organizations are trying to figure out how to get them to stick around. Pew recently found that visitors from Facebook are far less engaged than direct visitors. Here’s how sites that relaunched in the first half of 2014 are addressing that problem by making use of the continuous scroll (aka infinite scroll) feature in their article pages:

Read More at Poynter

Growth Hacking is Bull

Anyone claiming to be a growth hacker today must read Sean’s definition of the term because it strips much of the bull away from how the term is abused today.

We should be encouraging entrepreneurs to start businesses not startups. We should be arguing in favor of premium instead of freemium. We should be fighting for monetization from day one. We should come to terms with the harsh reality that instead of good being the enemy of great, sometimes good enough is simply good enough. Above all, we should emphasize proven, scalable, repeatable and sustainable ways of growing the business rather than trying to hack growth.

Read the full post at Marketing Land.

Who’s Watching the Watcher?

Amine Derkaoui, a 21-year-old Moroccan man, is pissed at Facebook. Last year he spent a few weeks training to screen illicit Facebook content through an outsourcing firm, for which he was paid a measly $1 an hour. He’s still fuming over it.

“It’s humiliating. They are just exploiting the third world,” Derkaoui complained in a thick French accent over Skype just a few weeks after Facebook filed their record $100 billion IPO. As a sort of payback, Derkaoui gave us some internal documents, which shed light on exactly how Facebook censors the dark content it doesn’t want you to see, and the people whose job it is to make sure you don’t.

Facebook has turned the stuff its millions of users post into gold. But perhaps just as important as the vacation albums and shared articles is the content it keeps out of user’s timelines: porn, gore, racism, cyberbullying, and so on. Facebook has fashioned itself the clean, well-lit alternative to the scary open Internet for both users and advertisers, thanks to the work of a small army of human content moderators like Derkaoui.

“We work to foster an environment where everyone can openly discuss issues and express their views, while respecting the rights of others,” reads Facebook’s community standards .

But walking the line between keeping Facebook clean and excessively censoring its content is tricky, and Facebook’s zealousness in scrubbing users’ content has led to a series of uproars. Last April, they deleted an innocent gay kiss and were accused of homophobia; a few months before that, the removal of a nude drawing sparked the art world’s ire. Most recently, angry “lactivists” have been staging protests over Facebook’s deletion of breast-feeding photos.

Read the whole article at Gawker

Users don’t hate change. They hate you.

The 9x Effect Applies to Redesigns Too 

Jack woke up to an “upgrade”!

Recently, more than the color of the leaves on the trees has been changing. Everyone seems to be redesigning. Apple’s OS7 Slate new features on Twitter Google , the Yahoo logo (and much of Yahoo ) — even my kid’s school website. And users are angry, annoyed, exhausted, eye-rolling… not delighted.

And so the usual comment comes: users hate change. Read More

The Beginner’s Guide to Twitter 

Do you have a parent, friend or colleague ready to ditch his or her digital training wheels and head into Twitter’s open wilderness? These pointers should get them started. And even Twitter experts might benefit from a quick refresher on the platform’s valuable tools.

First, the basics: What is Twitter all about?

It’s a platform wherein users share their thoughts, news, information and jokes in 140 characters of text or less. Twitter makes global communication cheap and measurable. Profiles are (usually) public — anyone in the world can see what you write, unless you elect to make your profile private. Users “follow” each other in order to keep tabs on and converse with specific people.

Read More at Mashable

Where Does Social Media Start, and a Mainstream Media News Cycle Die?

The architecture of news cycles has changed dramatically, of course. These days, by the time traditional print and broadcast news outlets present stories of the day, they’re more likely feeding back to us what we’ve already heard than they are giving us something brand new. The exceptions include investigative reporting, scoops or what we’ve vaguely called in the journalism biz, “enterprise” work — now known as “unique content” when we want to try to charge people for it.

But general news, like “ideas and products and messages and behaviors, spread like viruses,” says Malcolm Gladwell, the hip Christopher Columbus of modern trends. Read More